Dental Anxiety

Dental Anxiety

Problem

Dental Anxiety

Dental phobia is referred to as the fear of getting diagnosed with dental problems and receiving dental care treatments. This includes the fear of all minor and major dental issues and consequent dental procedures. Whilst dental phobia is not a much talked about or explored field of subject – the stats of dental phobia is modern people are much higher in comparison to the past times. Every 3 out of 6 people are recorded to fear dental care and treatment procedures in the United States which means that approximately 64 percent of the total American population fear dental procedures.

Our hygienists and dentists will review all the treatment & processes planned beforehand, so you’ll know exactly what to expect. Beyond that, you’ll be relaxed by our calming atmosphere; including relaxing music, noise-cancelling headphones to watch your favorite TV show, paraffin hand wax treatments, and much more.

Solutions

Dental Anxiety

There has been scientific research carried out to explore treatment options for dental phobias. Right Choice Dental Care is like Dental Spa environment which help you feel more comfortable and relaxed and relaxation therapies are thought to be helpful methods for treatment.

Our hygienists and dentists will review all the treatment & processes planned beforehand, so you’ll know exactly what to expect. Beyond that, you’ll be relaxed by our calming atmosphere; including relaxing music, noise-cancelling headphones to watch your favorite TV show, paraffin hand wax treatments, and much more.

FAQ's

01. What causes dental anxiety?
There are many reasons why some people have dental phobia and anxiety. Some of the common reasons include:
  • Fear of pain. Fear of pain is a very common reason for avoiding the dentist. Fear usually stems from an early dental experience that was unpleasant and painful, or from dental "pain and horror" stories told by others. Thanks to the many advances in dentistry made over the years, most of today's dental procedures are considerably less painful or even pain-free.
  • Fear of injections or fear the injection won't work. Many people are terrified of needles, especially when inserted into their mouth. Beyond this fear, others fear that the anesthesia hasn't yet taken effect or wasn't a large enough dose to eliminate any pain before the dental procedure begins.
  • Fear of anesthetic side effects. Some people fear the potential side effects of anesthesia such as dizziness, feeling faint, or nausea. Others don't like the numbness or "fat lip" associated with local anesthetics.
  • Feelings of helplessness and loss of control. It's common for people to feel these emotions considering the situation -- sitting in a dental chair with your mouth wide open, unable to see what's going on.
  • Embarrassment and loss of personal space. Many people feel uncomfortable about the physical closeness of the dentist or hygienist to their face. Others may feel self-conscious about the appearance of their teeth or possible mouth odors.
02. How do you get over dental anxiety?
If you're nervous about an upcoming dental visit, try these ways to curb your Anxiety:
  • Share your fears. If you're tense or anxious, tell your dentist and the dental staff. Expressing your concerns will help your dentist adapt the treatment to your needs.
  • Focus on breathing regularly and slowly during dental procedures. When people are nervous they tend to hold their breath, which decreases oxygen levels and further increases feelings of panic. As in some meditation techniques, a focus on slow, regular breathing helps reduce stress levels.
  • Listen to some tunes. If the sound of the drill bothers you, bring along your favorite music and earphones.
  • Watch what you eat and drink. Avoid caffeine before a dental appointment. Eat high-protein foods which – unlike sugary foods – produce a calming effect.
  • Use hand signals. Empower yourself by agreeing on hand signals to communicate with your dentist. When you feel uncomfortable, signal the dentist to ease off or stop the procedure.
  • Choose a low-stress appointment time. Select a time for your dental visit when you’re less likely to be rushed or under pressure. This might mean a Saturday or an early-morning appointment.
  • Get some good reviews. If you’re looking for a dentist, ask friends and relatives for recommendations. A glowing review about a dentist from someone you trust can help reduce your anxiety.
03. How common is dental anxiety?
Dental anxiety, or dental fear, is estimated to affect approximately 36% of the population, with a further 12% suffering from extreme dental fear.
04. Can dentist give you something for anxiety?

Oral anxiety relieving (anxiolytic) medications (such as temazepam) are sometimes prescribed by dentists or doctors to help anxious patients relax. A short-acting, small, single dose is usually taken one hour before the dental appointment.

Medication should only be taken following discussion with your dentist or doctor. You will need someone to accompany you to and from the dental visit as you cannot safely drive a car while under the influence of anxiolytic medication.

05. How dental anxiety or phobia can affect your oral health?

Avoiding the dentist can result in the worsening of the dental disease, a greater need for emergency care, or more complex treatment. Also, it can feed the underlying problem of dental anxiety. This is known as the ‘vicious cycle of dental anxiety.

Regular dental check-ups, cleans and screening X-rays can prevent dental disease and help the dentist find any problems early, so that simpler and less invasive treatments are needed.

By avoiding going to the dentist, not only are you more likely to need more complex treatments when you do finally attend, but you are also missing out on learning how to better care for your oral health.

Most dental disease is lifestyle-related and preventable. The lifestyle factors that lead to dental disease are very similar to those that lead to diabetes, obesity, heart disease, stroke and some cancers, so taking care of your oral and general health is very important.